Rouleau Mausoleum at Hope Cemetery

After I filmed, I conducted some research. I discovered there is a Rouleau Granite Company. Presuming the Rouleaus buried here are related, it makes sense they would have such an amazing mausoleum. You’ll discover some other wonderful mausoleums in this video. Plus, an interesting “resume” on the back of a crypt. Come with me toContinue reading “Rouleau Mausoleum at Hope Cemetery”

Hope Cemetery #2: More Funerary Art!

“Hope Cemetery is a rural cemetery[1] in Barre, Vermont. The city calls itself the “Granite Capital of the World”, and the cemetery is known for the superb granite craftsmanship on its memorials and tombstones. Barre is also home to the world’s largest “deep hole” granite quarry, the Rock of Ages quarry, also known as theContinue reading “Hope Cemetery #2: More Funerary Art!”

Levi P. Morton

“Levi Parsons Morton (May 16, 1824 – May 16, 1920) was the 22nd vice president of the United States from 1889 to 1893. He also served as United States ambassador to France, as a U.S. representative from New York, and as the 31st governor of New York. The son of a Congregational minister, Morton wasContinue reading “Levi P. Morton”

Community Baptist Church and Parsonage: National Register of Historic Places!

“The Community Baptist Church and Parsonage are a historic church property at 2 and 10 Mountain Road in the center of Montgomery, Vermont. The church, built in 1866, is a prominently placed example of Greek Revival architecture, while the adjacent parsonage house is a well-preserved example of the Colonial Revival. The church was for manyContinue reading “Community Baptist Church and Parsonage: National Register of Historic Places!”

First Congregational Church of Orwell

“The First Congregational Church (or Orwell Congregational Church) is a historic church in Orwell, Vermont. The current meeting house was built in 1843, and is one of state’s best examples of Greek Revival ecclesiastical architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2001.[1] Architecture: The First Congregational Church stands prominently inContinue reading “First Congregational Church of Orwell”

Shoreham Congregational Church

Learn more about the Shoreham Congregational Church in today’s video. Although there is no steeple, it does offer both a 4-faced clock tower AND an absolutely GORGEOUS belfry! We can see just how amazing that master craftsman was who built this church! “Shoreham Congregational Church is a historic church on School Street in Shoreham, Vermont.Continue reading “Shoreham Congregational Church”

Strolling St. Genevieve Cemetery

In this video, you’ll see the cross bearing Christ’s crucifixion and a flagpole with a single person’s name attached to it. Plus, there is a variety of graves shared as well. First used in 1863, this cemetery has 890 graves. The church of the same name closed in 2020 due to low participation. Its closureContinue reading “Strolling St. Genevieve Cemetery”

Whiting Community Church INTERIOR History Tour!!

After my video on the exterior of the Whiting Union Church (the original name of the Whiting Community Church) aired, Pastor Brett Cody reached out. He offered to share the history with me AND a tour of the INTERIOR! How could I refuse??? Please enjoy this exclusive look inside this wonderful church! What wonders areContinue reading “Whiting Community Church INTERIOR History Tour!!”

Addison Community Baptist Church

“The Addison Community Baptist Church is a historic church building at 4970 Vermont Route 22A in the village center of Addison, Vermont. Built in 1816 and restyled in 1849, it is one of Vermont’s oldest Baptist churches, and a good local example of Greek Revival architecture. It was listed on the National Register of HistoricContinue reading “Addison Community Baptist Church”

Whiting Meetinghouse: State Register of Historic Places!

So, why two doors? Originally, men sat on one side of the church and women on the other. Thus, it was easier to have two doors to enter and exit. This church is known by a few names. Whiting Union Church, Whiting Meetinghouse and now it’s the Whiting Community Church. Regardless of its many names,Continue reading “Whiting Meetinghouse: State Register of Historic Places!”

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