Levi P. Morton

“Levi Parsons Morton (May 16, 1824 – May 16, 1920) was the 22nd vice president of the United States from 1889 to 1893. He also served as United States ambassador to France, as a U.S. representative from New York, and as the 31st governor of New York. The son of a Congregational minister, Morton wasContinue reading “Levi P. Morton”

First Congregational Church of Orwell

“The First Congregational Church (or Orwell Congregational Church) is a historic church in Orwell, Vermont. The current meeting house was built in 1843, and is one of state’s best examples of Greek Revival ecclesiastical architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2001.[1] Architecture: The First Congregational Church stands prominently inContinue reading “First Congregational Church of Orwell”

Shoreham Congregational Church

Learn more about the Shoreham Congregational Church in today’s video. Although there is no steeple, it does offer both a 4-faced clock tower AND an absolutely GORGEOUS belfry! We can see just how amazing that master craftsman was who built this church! “Shoreham Congregational Church is a historic church on School Street in Shoreham, Vermont.Continue reading “Shoreham Congregational Church”

Whiting Meetinghouse: State Register of Historic Places!

So, why two doors? Originally, men sat on one side of the church and women on the other. Thus, it was easier to have two doors to enter and exit. This church is known by a few names. Whiting Union Church, Whiting Meetinghouse and now it’s the Whiting Community Church. Regardless of its many names,Continue reading “Whiting Meetinghouse: State Register of Historic Places!”

Sudbury Congregational Church

Today’s video is about the Sudbury Congregational Church located in Sudbury, Vermont. According to Google Maps, it’s “formerly” the Congregational Church and Town Hall. One thing I do know for sure is that this building is on the National Register of Historic Places. It is also stunning, even at dusk. What a treat to standContinue reading “Sudbury Congregational Church”

Richmond Congregational Church in Richmond, Vermont

Today’s video is both a history of this place on the National Register of Historic Places and a partial walk-around. The Richmond Congregational Church is a historic church at 20 Church Street in Richmond, Vermont, United States. Built in 1903-04, it is a significant local example of Colonial Revival architecture, designed by prominent Vermont architect Walter R. B. Willcox.Continue reading “Richmond Congregational Church in Richmond, Vermont”

Williston Congregational Church in Williston, Vermont

Today’s video is a combination of the history and a walk-around of the Williston Congregational Church in Williston, Vermont. (The snow is a tch deeper in Williston than where I live in Chittenden County. Since I don’t wear boots, my feet got a bit wet and even colder.) But, I was able to walk aroundContinue reading “Williston Congregational Church in Williston, Vermont”

Leicester Meeting House in Leicester, Vermont

https://youtu.be/nwdp2PQCABk Today’s film topic is the Leicester Meeting House in Leicester, Vermont.  It is located directly off of Route 7 and is abundantly easy to find.  Note that a couple of windows could use some attention.  Better to fix now than wait until the repairs are very expensive. Also wondering what those “drawers” are forContinue reading “Leicester Meeting House in Leicester, Vermont”

Starksboro Village Meeting House in Starksboro, Vermont

Today’s video is on the Starksboro Village Meeting House located in Starksboro, Vermont.  It is directly on Route 116 and parking is super easy, especially on a weekend or holiday.  The town’s office is right next door and the circular road/parking is between the buildings. “The Starksboro Village Meeting House is a historic church and town hallContinue reading “Starksboro Village Meeting House in Starksboro, Vermont”

Rockingham Meeting-House Cemetery: REVOLUTIONARY WAR & WAR OF 1812 DEAD!!

The Rockingham Meeting-House Cemetery is located behind the Rockingham Meeting House and is one-third of the National Historic Landmark designation.  The other two-thirds are the Meeting House and Receiving Tomb.  I have videos on both.  “The adjacent cemetery, which continues in use today, contains more than 1,000 graves, and is a treasure trove of informationContinue reading “Rockingham Meeting-House Cemetery: REVOLUTIONARY WAR & WAR OF 1812 DEAD!!”

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