Industrial Past of Colchester Causeway

Inscription: “If you travel a mile north along the bike path, you’ll find a lake crossing with stunning views: a 3.5-mile causeway connecting Colchester Point to Allen’s Point in South Hero, Vermont. While thousands of bicyclists and walkers use this marble causeway for recreation, it has a very industrial past. The Rutland Railroad opened theContinue reading “Industrial Past of Colchester Causeway”

Samuel de Champlain: “Here is History”

“Here is History” is a bold declarative statement. It is also true. If this were a line at the beginning of a book, I would eagerly read on. Would you? From the State Historic Marker: “These islands were first seen by a European in 1609, when Samuel De Champlain explored the Lake which bears hisContinue reading “Samuel de Champlain: “Here is History””

Silas Wright Monument and Marker

From the State Historic Marker: “Born at Amherst, Mass., Silas Wright came to Weybridge as an infant and grew up here. Graduated from Middlebury College in 1815, he studied Law at Sandy Hill, N.Y.; began Law practice at Canton, N.Y. in 1819, and entered politics there. A Brigadier General by 1824, he was State Senator,Continue reading “Silas Wright Monument and Marker”

Colonel Sheldon and His Home

From the State Historic Marker: “In 1776, at the request of General Washington, Elisha Sheldon was commissioned by Congress to raise a regiment of cavalry. Named the 2nd Continental Light Dragoons, the unit served with distinction throughout the Revolutionary War. In 1791, Colonel Sheldon, his sons Major Samuel, Elisha, Jr., and George, and their familiesContinue reading “Colonel Sheldon and His Home”

St. Albans Raiders Try to BURN Bridge!

From the State Historic Marker: “On their retreat to Canada after an attack on St. Albans, a 22-man Confederate detachment rode into Sheldon near dark. Crossing a covered bridge which stood on the site, they set it on fire, but alert village citizens saved the bridge. In great haste to escape an aroused countryside, theContinue reading “St. Albans Raiders Try to BURN Bridge!”

Old Stone Shop

“For many years after 1808, farm implements were manufactured here. Lyman Batcheller & his sons bought the forge in 1835, and their forks became famous throughout the U.S. and Europe. In 1902 they merged with the firm making True Temper products, which re-built the Inn.”-State Historic Marker “The Old Stone Shop is the oldest andContinue reading “Old Stone Shop”

The Revolutionary War from a State Historic Marker

“Ethan Allen crossed Lake Champlain to capture Fort Ticonderoga on May 10, 1775 for “America’s First Victory.” Allen’s expedition passed through here on May 5, 1775. Nathan Beman from Manchester guided the expedition into the fort; John Roberts of Manchester was the head of the expedition’s largest immediate family. In 1777, after evacuating Ft. TiContinue reading “The Revolutionary War from a State Historic Marker”

Birthplace of Senator George F. Edmunds

“George Franklin Edmunds (February 1, 1828 – February 27, 1919) was a Republican U.S. Senator from Vermont. Before entering the U.S. Senate, he served in a number of high-profile positions, including Speaker of the Vermont House of Representatives, and President pro tempore of the Vermont State Senate. Edmunds was born in Richmond, Vermont and began to study law while still a teenager; he proved an adeptContinue reading “Birthplace of Senator George F. Edmunds”

Union Meetinghouse

From the Historic Marker: “Frederick Douglass delivered a fiery abolitionist speech here in July 1843. Born in slavery in Maryland, Douglass freed himself by escaping to the north, where he became a tireless crusader for African American freedom and equality. He was among the greatest orators and black leaders of the 19th century. The FerrisburghContinue reading “Union Meetinghouse”

The Gag Rule/William Slade

Today’s video is all about a State Historic Marker I noticed after I filmed the Cornwall Town Hall and War Memorial. I thought it would be more information on the Town Hall, but no. “The Gag Rule: 1836-1844 In the 1830s, Americans were becoming outspoken about slavery, inundating Congress with abolitionist petitions. Southern legislators believedContinue reading “The Gag Rule/William Slade”

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