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Hope Cemetery’s FuneraryArt: Part 1

“Hope Cemetery is a rural cemetery[1] in Barre, Vermont. The city calls itself the “Granite Capital of the World”, and the cemetery is known for the superb granite craftsmanship on its memorials and tombstones. Barre is also home to the world’s largest “deep hole” granite quarry, the Rock of Ages quarry, also known as theContinue reading “Hope Cemetery’s FuneraryArt: Part 1”

The Ticonderoga: National Historic Landmark

“The steamboat Ticonderoga is one of two remaining side-paddle-wheel passenger steamers with a vertical beam engine of the type that provided freight and passenger service on America’s bays, lakes and rivers from the early 19th to the mid-20th centuries. Commissioned by the Champlain Transportation Company, Ticonderoga was built in 1906 at the Shelburne Shipyard inContinue reading “The Ticonderoga: National Historic Landmark”

Receiving Vault with Shelves and Working Rollers!!

The first burial in Lake View Cemetery was in 1799. There are 1286 graves. Although it is across from St. Genevieve Cemetery, it is otherwise surrounded by empty land. “A receiving vault or receiving tomb,[1] sometimes also known as a public vault, is a structure designed to temporarily store dead bodies in winter months whenContinue reading “Receiving Vault with Shelves and Working Rollers!!”

THANKS FOR SUBSCRIBING!!

On June 27, my birthday, I had produced a Call to Action video. I had asked for 210 subscribers by the end of the month. You know what? We hit 211!! A huge thanks for that! In today’s video, I explained why I asked. #travelingforhistory101  #subscribers #subscribe #calltoaction #thanksforsubscribing #thankyou

Old Mill and Dam: Slate History Trail

“Little Hazard Brook once powered sawmills and slate mills as it wound its way from Glen Lake, or Screwsriver Pond, to Lake Bomoseen. From the sawmill, Hazard Brook ran underground to the waterwheel in the slate mill. An old outlet near the Barlow house may have furnished water power for earlier mills. “-Bomoseen State ParkContinue reading “Old Mill and Dam: Slate History Trail”

Remainder of Slate Mill

“The Slate Mill: In 1868, the slate company built a new mill for the preparation of purple and green flooring, billiard tables, sinks and washtubs. At the time the mill was constructed, it was one of the largest slate finishing mills in the country. The mill was powered by a waterwheel 24 feet in diameter.Continue reading “Remainder of Slate Mill”

Birthplace of Senator George F. Edmunds

“George Franklin Edmunds (February 1, 1828 – February 27, 1919) was a Republican U.S. Senator from Vermont. Before entering the U.S. Senate, he served in a number of high-profile positions, including Speaker of the Vermont House of Representatives, and President pro tempore of the Vermont State Senate. Edmunds was born in Richmond, Vermont and began to study law while still a teenager; he proved an adeptContinue reading “Birthplace of Senator George F. Edmunds”

Call to Action: Let’s Reach 210 Subscribers by the End of this Month!

Today is my birthday and I have a Call to Action video. By the end of this month, so we have 4 days, to gain merely 4 more subscribers to my YouTube channel. More is better, for sure, but I’m only asking for 4. So, please keep sharing my videos with anyone you think wouldContinue reading “Call to Action: Let’s Reach 210 Subscribers by the End of this Month!”

Let’s Enter the Receiving Tomb…

“A receiving vault or receiving tomb,[1] sometimes also known as a public vault, is a structure designed to temporarily store dead bodies in winter months when the ground is too frozen to dig a permanent grave in a cemetery. Technological advancements in excavation, embalming, and refrigeration have rendered the receiving vault obsolete. Receiving vaults largelyContinue reading “Let’s Enter the Receiving Tomb…”

Found a Fountain!

I visited the Hinesburg Village Cemetery recently. And it did not disappoint! Today’s video is on the beautiful fountain I found. Typically, a fountain such as this in a cemetery suggests the cemetery’s style was a Victorian Lawn Park. As the name suggests, its purpose was to encourage people to visit the cemetery for theContinue reading “Found a Fountain!”

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